Important Sections of Indian Evidence Act,1872

The Indian Evidence Act, identified as Act no. 1 of 1872, and came into force on 1 September, 1872. It has eleven chapters and 167 sections. It is an Adjective law.

Total Section: 167

Important Sections are:

Section 3 – Interpretation Clause.

Section 4 – May Presume.

Section 5 – Evidence may be given of facts in issue and relevant facts.

Section 6 – Relevancy of facts forming part of same transaction.

Section 7 – Facts which are occasion, cause or effect of facts in issue.

Section 8 – Motive preparation and previous or subsequent conduct.

Section 9 – Facts necessary to explain or introduce relevant facts.

Section 11 – When Facts not otherwise relevant become relevant.

Section 40 to Section 44 – Judgments of Courts of Justice, When Relevant.

Section 45 – Opinions of experts.

Section 47 – Opinions as to handwriting when relevant.

Section 51 – Grounds of opinion when relevant.

Section 52 to Section 55 – Character When Relevant.

Section 56 to Section 58 – Facts Which Need Not be Proved.

Section 59 – Proof of facts by oral evidence.

Section 60 – Oral evidence must be direct.

Section 62 – Primary evidence.

Section 63 – Secondary Evidence.

Section 65 – Cases in which secondary evidence relating to documents may be given.

Section 65B – Admissibility of electronic records.

Section 74 – Public documents.

Section 75 – Private documents.

Section 90 – Presumption as to documents thirty years old.

Section 91 – Evidence of terms of contracts, grant and other dispositions of property reduced to form of documents.

Section 110 – Burden of proof as to ownership.

Section 111 – Proof of good faith in transactions where one party is in relation of active confidence.

Section 111A – Presumption as to certain offences.

Section 112 – Birth during marriage, conclusive proof of legitimacy.

Section 113A – Presumption as to abetment of suicide by a married women.

Section 113B – Presumption as to dowry death.

Section 114 – Court may presume existence of certain facts.

Section 114A – Presumption as to absence of consent in certain prosecutions for rape.

Section 115 to Section 117 – Estoppel.

Section 118 – Who may testify?

Section 119 – Witness unable to communicate verbally/Dumb witness.

Section 122 – Communications during marriage.

Section 123 – Evidence as to affairs of State.

Section 124 – Official communications.

Section 132 – Witness not excused from answering on ground that answer will criminate.

Section 134 – Number of witnesses.

Section 137 – Examination-in-chief.

Section 141 – Leading questions.

Section 142 – When they must not be asked.

Section 143 – When they must be asked.

Section 145 – Cross-examination as to previous statements in writing.

Section 151 – Indecent and scandalous questions.

Section 157 – Former statements of witness may be proved to corroborate later testimony as to same fact.

Section 159 – Refreshing memory.